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GSIS slated to move its art collection to National Museum

The Government Service Insurance System today announced that all its art works including Juan Luna’s ‘Parisian Life’, will have a new home at the National Museum within the second semester this year, after the signing of a Memorandum of Agreement between the GSIS and the National Museum of the Philippines.

Under the agreement, the GSIS will transfer the management of the GSIS collection to the National Museum ”to preserve, maintain, secure and promote the collection … with highest standards of care and diligence.”

The agreement will be effective for five years to start upon the complete transfer of the custody of the GSIS Art Collection from the GSIS to the Museum.

According to the National Museum, the entire north wing of the main exhibition floor of the National Art Gallery, devoted to 20th century and contemporary Filipino art, will be renamed the Government Service Insurance System Wing. This comprises six exhibition halls and three hallway galleries totaling approximately 1500 square meters of floor area.

President and General Manager Robert G. Vergara inspected the prospective Wing that is currently undergoing renovation. The Museum expects the renovation to be completed this July.

“It is an impressive location, quite spacious and caters to a wider audience that will now have the opportunity to see and appreciate the GSIS art collection.”

As of December 2011, the GSIS collection comprises 308 pieces of art recorded in its books which include the works of such masters as Juan Luna, Fernando Amorsolo, Botong Francisco, Vicente Manansala, HR Ocampo, Bencab and Federico Alcuaz.

Selected art and heritage pieces from the Metropolitan Theater, which the GSIS owns, will also be entrusted to the Museum. The winning entries from the GSIS Art Competitions from 2004 to 2011 will be included in the transfer as well.

The decision of the current GSIS Board of Trustees to transfer the collection to the Museum forms part of the continuing review of the policies of the pension fund.

“Preserving and maintaining art works is beyond the mandate of the GSIS as a social insurance institution and insurer of government properties”, Vergara said.

“We are happy to partner with the Museum, the principal cultural institution that takes the lead, in preserving and promoting the country’s cultural and artistic legacy.”